Other Global Datasets


Throughout the global air-sea flux community there are a number of groups and organizations working on flux or related datasets. Among those actively involved in SeaFlux include (global air-sea flux products):

  • HOAPS
    Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data
    “HOAPS-3 contains a completely reprocessed time-series of global ocean freshwater flux related parameters, ranging from 07/1987 to 12/2005. Key features of the update are a new precipitation algorithm, the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder V5 SST dataset, a new procedure to synthezise failed 85Ghz channels on DMSP F08, and a new twice daily gridded data-product, HOAPS-C (composite).”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the HOAPS site.

  • OA Flux
    Objectively Analyzed Air-Sea Fluxes
    “The OAFlux project is an ongoing research and development project for global air-sea fluxes. The project is committed to developing enhanced global estimates of air-sea fluxes of heat, fresh water, and momentum, with a goal of establishing a one-stop source for global ocean surface forcing datasets that serves the needs of the ocean and climate research community. The project focuses on efforts to improve the quantification of physical interactions and feedbacks between the ocean and atmosphere, and gain enhanced understanding of the role that these air-sea processes play in global energy budget, water cycle, atmosphere and ocean circulation, and the Earth’s climate.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the OA Flux site.

  • NCEP/NCAR Global Reanalysis
    National Center for Environmental Protection/National Center for Atmospheric Research
    “Products from NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Project (NNRP or R1) are archived in this dataset. The resolution of the global Reanalysis Model is T62 (209 km) with 28 vertical sigma levels. Results are available at 6 hour intervals. Although the initial plan is to reanalyze the data for a 40-year period (1957-1996), production has gone back to 1948 and going forward continuously. Future plans call for rerunning the entire period as next generation models are ready.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the NCEP/NCAR site.

  • GSSTF
    Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes
    “The Version 2 of Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF) Data are produced by the surface turbulent fluxes research group at NASA GSFC (Code 912). Currently, the Goddard DAAC maintains archives of three products (in binary format) from this data set.The first two provide daily and monthly-mean, global ocean, 1-degree latitude by 1-degree longitude, gridded surface fluxes and other related parameters, from July 1987 through December 2000. The third product provides the related 12 monthly-mean and one annual-mean climatology. An updated Version 2b was recently released and is available on their website as well.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the GSSTF site.

  • Ifremer
    French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea
    “The entire 16-year surface turbulent fluxes estimated from satellite observations are reprocessed. The main improvements with respected to previous products are related to the assessment of the surface winds retrieved from ERS-1, ERS-2, and QuikSCAT scatterometers, and to the use of the new NOAA sea surface temperature estimates. The latter are daily-averaged and 0.25° in longitude and latitude over the global ocean. The new turbulent fluxes are estimated using Fairall et al (2003) bulk algorithm.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the Ifremer site.

  • ECMWF
    European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts
    ECMWF provides forecasts, as well as global reanalysis products, such as a the ERA-40.
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the ECMWF site.

  • J-OFURO
    Japanese Ocean Flux Data sets with Use of Remote
    Sensing Observations
    “We can obtain considerably homogeneous data with high resolution using analysis and satellite data. Therefore, it is considered that analysis and satellite data are suitable for obtaining globally covered fluxes between ocean and atmosphere. We have constructed ocean surface flux datasets by mainly using satellite data. The dataset has been named by the Japanese Ocean Flux datasets with use of remote sensing observations (J-OFURO). Recently, we reconstructed surface heat and momentum flux data in J-OFURO to represent version 2 (J-OFURO2).”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the J-OFURO site.

  • 20th Century Reanalysis (20CR)
    National Center for Environmental Protection/National Center for Atmospheric Research
    “The NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis product starts from 1948, leaving many important climate events such as 1930’s dust bowl droughts uncovered. To expand the coverage of global gridded reanalyses, the 20th Century Reanalysis Project is an effort led by PSD and the University of Colorado CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center to produce a reanalysis dataset spanning the entire twentieth century, assimilating only surface observations of synoptic pressure, monthly sea surface temperature and sea ice distribution.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the 20th Century Reanalysis site or Reanalyses.org site.

  • TropFlux
    Air-Sea Fluxes for the Global Tropical Oceans
    “TropFlux is a tropical heat and momentum flux dataset based on ERA-interim and ISCCP datasets starting from 1979 to near real time, in daily/monthly/1×1 resolutions. The dataset is updated regularly, and data will be available 3-4 months behind present.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the TropFlux site.

Associated groups that produce products relevant to the air-sea flux community include:

  • GPCP
    Global Precipitation Climatology Project
    “The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) was established by the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) to address the problem of quantifying the distribution of precipitation around the globe over many years. The general approach is to combine the precipitation information available from each of several sources into a final merged product, taking advantage of the strengths of each data type.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the GPCP site.

  • QuikSCAT
    QuikSCAT/SeaWinds Scatterometer Data Products
    “The QuikSCAT products of ocean surface winds at 10m height, as processed by NOAA/NESDIS, are retrieved using observation data from NASA/JPL’s SeaWinds Scatterometer aboard the QuikSCAT. The empirical retrieval model currently used is referred to as QSCAT1, which relates normalized radar cross-section with wind speed and direction.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the QuikSCAT site.

  • NCDC Winds
    National Climatic Data Center Blended Winds Product
    “The Blended Sea Winds contain globally gridded, high resolution ocean surface vector winds and wind stresses on a global 0.25° grid, and multiple time resolutions of 6-hourly, daily, monthly, and 11-year (1995-2005) climatological monthlies. The period of record is 9 July 1987 – present. The wind speeds were generated by blending observations from multiple satellites.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the NCDC Winds site.

  • Reynolds SST
    Reynolds Optimum Interpolation Version 2.0 Sea Surface Temperatures
    “A real-time global sea surface temperature (SST) analysis has been developed by Richard Reynolds from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). Also, a monthly one-degree global SST climatology was constructed using these analyses by the Climate Prediction Center (CPC/NOAA). This climatology derived from monthly Optimum Interpolation (OIv2) SST analyses with an adjusted base period of 1971-2000 was used in computing the SST anomaly field using a weighted monthly mean climatology and the current observed Reynolds SST field.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the Reynolds SST site.

  • CCMP
    Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform Ocean Surface Winds
    “The CCMP data product is derived through cross-calibration and assimilation of ocean surface wind data from SSM/I, TMI, AMSR-E, SeaWinds on QuikSCAT, and SeaWinds on ADEOS-II. Cross calibration is performed by Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) under the DISCOVER project (http://www.remss.com/). These data sets are combined with conventional observations and a starting estimate of the wind field using a variational analysis method (VAM). The ECMWF Reanalysis (ERA-40) is used as the starting estimate (or background) for July 1987 until December 1998 and the ECMWF Operational Analysis is used from January 1999 onward.”
    —— For more information or to download this dataset, please visit the CCMP site @ PODAAC.

If you would like your dataset or group listed on this page and it is not, or if you would like the information here to be updated, please email seaflux@whoi.edu.